3 Ways To Tell That Your Social Media Content Is Underperforming

2 million posts, articles, and videos are uploaded to LinkedIn every day.


95 million photos are uploaded to Instagram per day.


340 million tweets are shared on Twitter daily.


350 million photos are uploaded to Facebook on a daily basis.


There’s a lot of noise and competition for attention on social media. So, as great as it is to know when your activity is performing well, it’s as important (if not more important) to understand when it’s not going so well.

After all, the algorithms take past performance into account. Which means, if you don’t fix the problem now, it could have an exponentially negative impact on your future performance too.


But how do you know if your social media content’s not doing as well as it could?


How To Identify Poor Social Media Content


1. Ask “Would I Read This?”


“Would I read this?” is possibly the most important question you can ask.


Well, a variation of it.


“Would I read something like this if someone else shared it about a different topic?” is a better question, but that’s not as snappy.


Basically, if it wouldn’t entice you, how can you expect it to work for other people?


Obviously, you’ve got a vested interest in your topic, so you need to think about it in a different context.


For example, because I’m in social media, I might ask “If someone shared a post like this about photography, would it catch my eye?”.


That way, I’m not clouding my own judgement with my interest and knowledge of the social media landscape.


2. Take A Look At Your Analytics


Despite what some people might think, analytics aren’t a clear cut way of determining if you’re content is under-performing. Too many people get caught up in vanity metrics and forget to look at the figures within a wider context.


Having said that, they can be a good indicator.


For example, in the unlikely event your post gets zero impressions, zero reach, zero engagement and so on, that would be fair evidence to say your content is underperforming.


But in more practical terms, if you’re not sure what would class as underperforming content, just take a look back over time. Are you stats getting gradually better or are they declining?


3. Check Who Is Engaging

Your analytics might be looking great. They might be looking dire.


Either way, it’s more about who those figures represent.


If you’ve followed me for a while, you might have heard me say something along the lines of…


“Would you rather have 10,000 followers with no intention to buy or 100 followers made up of your ideal audience?”


Well, this goes for almost all metrics you might track. Who is it that’s making up these figures?


Are the comments on your latest post from random people, or are they from warm leads travelling through your sales funnel?


Are your followers ever going to buy from you, or are they your Mum’s friends?


Are the people clicking through to your website potential customers, or randoms tempted by a freebie?


Even if your analytics say your social media content is overperforming, if it’s not from the right people, your content might actually be underperforming.


How To Improve Poor Social Media Content

Well, let’s just flip the previous points on their head…

  1. Produce content you would want to see.

  2. See what’s worked before.

  3. Make sure it appeals to your target market.

Sometimes, it’s not always that easy. So, if you’re struggling to turn your content ship around, use me.


I’ve got podcast episodes dedicated to producing social media content, there are tips scattered across my blog and I share insights on my social media profiles.


And if you’re still struggling, reach out. I don’t bite.


Let’s have a chat and see how we can get your content back on track.

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© 2020 by Matt Johnson